Tag Archives: moving help

Should You Help Your Friends Move?

Should You Help Your Friends Move?

Have you ever wondered how strong of a friendship you and your bestie have?  You can gauge your comraderie by their level of help during a move.  Let’s put it this way  – if there was a ceremony for friendship the “friendship vows” would be  ” in moving and in chillaxing.”   Check below for our “Should You Help Your Friends Move?” guide – also an accurate evaluation of your bromance.

Everyone who has moved while in college or shortly thereafter knows how precious moving day help can be.  Let us help you find out if you should help your friends move:

TYPES OF FRIENDSHIPS and RESPECTIVE MOVE SCORE

  1. Enabling Friendship:  Move Score 8                                                            This friendship is a special bond between buds that empower each other to do the impossible.  This friend will boost your ego and are definitely one of the best types of friends to call for a move.
  2. Hot and Cold Friendship: Move Score 5                                                           The Hot and Cold friend is like a corked bat. Your hot and cold friend may show up, show up late or not at all but they do, they will easily provide that extra umph to get you home.
  3. Class Clown Friendship: Move Score 3                                                              One of the worst friends to help with a move – this friend loves pranks and those are not appreciated while moving.  Also, you will be so busy laughing – nothing will get moved.
  4. Bromance: Move Score 9                                                                                              You know that friend who completely admires you for whatever reason.  This is the best friend to invite for a move. This friend will do the entire move for you – to show up and just to be around your awesomeness
  5. Drinking Buddies: Move Score -10                                                                        Just.  Don’t.
  6. The Long Distance Friend: Move Score 6                                                       If you are moving long distance and actually hiring long distance movers – the long distance friend is a great for moral support – mainly because they won’t actually have to do any heavy lifting.

Helping your friends move can make or break a friendship.  Your patience will be tested but after all the back-breaking effort – you’ll become better buds after a move together.  Just don’t forget the pizza and drinks.

Of course, you could avoid all of the moving drama by hiring local movers, movers within 100 miles of your original residence or long distance movers.

MOVING IN THE SNOW

MOVING IN THE SNOW BY MOVER HELP


Moving in the snow is probably one of the most annoying things in the entire world. Carrying a 200 lb. dresser across slippery ice – a problem for most moving companies but movers in Boston and other New England movers have been practicing the art of “moving in the snow” for many cold, frost-bitten years. Our moving crews have been moving for over 37 winters of snow and are happy to share some really important moving tips for those wintery months.

  1. SAFETY IS NUMBER ONE – There are so many things that can go wrong during winter moves. But safety of the crew members, you and your furniture is the top priority. We highly recommend hiring movers during winter months. The inside of your home and the truck itself can get as slippery as the ground outside and most people don’t realize this until its too late. All of our moving crews carry shovels, rock salt and sand with us but you should always call your mover anyway and make sure they have these things handy.
  2. DRIVING A MOVING TRUCK IN THE SNOW – Unless you are an expert truck driver – don’t do it. I have seen other moving trucks literally slide down the hills of Boston. Snowy roads are not something for an awkward moving truck to be travelling in – leave this feat to the experts. In the case that you do get stuck – call roadside assistance immediately and place the orange markers out. Our moving trucks get winter overhauls but renting a truck you may be shocked to find the lack of winter snow tires and/or moving chains.
  3. BE PREPARED – Things you will need for a move in the snow – ice melt/salt, sand, shovels, window scraper, floor and truck runners to minimize slipping, heavy-duty gloves – hands get slippery in the winter too.
  4. DON’T RISK IT – I remember a customer who wanted us to move a hot tub that had just been unhooked ( leaking water ) across a football field of ice an down icy steps. We did everything we could to get that across but the ice was a foot deep and did not melt with all of our salt, ice melt and sand. We did our best without it but in the end we needed to use a crane to get that bad Larry out. Sometimes there is nothing that you can do about the weather – better safe than sorry.
  5. WATCH THE WEATER – It can change drastically. A sunny day in the North East can easily turn into a blizzard before your offload.
  6. WINE BOTTLES BREAK IN COLD WEATHER – I know, it’s not fair. If you are doing a long distance move – or one that is going into storage during winter months, please make sure you hire a mover with climate-controlled storage or your expensive wine collection could be ruined. Also, overnight storage is not recommended for bottled liquids. They may break overnight in the cold.
  7. ELECTRONICS and PLANTS DON’T LIKE SNOW – Like wine, plants don’t fair well during winter month moves. When hiring long distance movers in Boston or other snowy cities, make sure your mover is using climate-controlled storage facilities and not offloading your shipment into a warehouse. Electronics generally do fine in the winter but may need a thawing period.
  8. TURN THE HEAT ON – Make sure your heat is on in the new house or this will only prolong your moving issues.

Moving in the winter can be a challenge but by following our mover help, you will be prepared to weather any winter storm.

Moving in the Snow
Moving in the Snow

Moving with a Pet

 

Moving with a Pet

Moving with a Pet
Moving with a Pet

 

Somehow my post on moving with a pet ended up longer than my previous post about moving with kids…  The actual moving with a pet does present more of a challenge – unless your kids are “animals” too.

Here is a long-winded list on how to handle moving with a pet.   The first section of this post is really for moving long distance with a pet.  If you are moving close-by you can skip to the bottom of the post to where I discuss getting your new pet acclimated to his/her new abode.

If you are hiring movers, make sure your pet is at a relatives house or  put in an area of your house so they do not feel threatened by the new movers.  Also, when the movers are there, it may be unsafe if a pet is running around.  Let your movers know that you have a pet and hire pet-friendly movers.

 

Section 1 – Long Distance Moving with a Pet

Call the vet and schedule an appointment as soon as you can. If you wait until the last minute you may not get an appointment – my vet is scheduled 3 weeks in advance
If your pet has a condition your vet will suggest treatment or sedation techniques for the ride/flight.
You will need vaccine records and licenses if you are traveling.  If you are moving to Canada – you will not cross the border without this.  I should mention those moving to Hawaii will need to quarantine their pet for months before their move.  This can be an annoyance most are not aware of.
If you are flying, you will need a sedative for your pet.  I don’t suggest putting your pet on a plane in winter as it gets really cold for them.  My vet has always given me a light sedative so my pets are not “out cold” but they are comfortable – this really eliminates the stress of the situation.. This is also helpful if you have a pet that you know doesn’t travel well, is cage aggressive or could bite movers.
Get copies of vet records and vaccination certificates. You need to have actual license papers for any long distance moves or when you are flying with your pet.  If your pet has a rabies tag – this does not count!  They won’t let you fly without paperwork from your vet.
If your pet is traveling by air, you will probably need a health certificate from the vet, and there may be a time requirement so plan accordingly.

Make your airline reservations directly with the airline if you are flying to your new destination with your pet. Cats and small dogs can often fly in a small carrier with you in the cabin. Larger pets and large carriers may require transport in the cargo area. The latter is probably the most stressful and dangerous mode of transportation for your pet–see Warnings below, and check out How to Minimize Risk to a Pet in the Cargo Area of an Airplane.
Confirm they accept pets. Keep in mind airlines have very specific regulations for pets transported in the cargo area. They will not allow a pet to fly in temperatures in departure, layover or destination cities if the temperatures are too hot or too cold. It may be a pleasant 75 degrees F in Atlanta but it may be 40 degrees F in Chicago. The decision may not be made until the day of your flight.
Travel on the same flight as your pet if your pet is going to be in the cargo area. Ask the airline if you can watch your pet being loaded and unloaded into the cargo hold. When you board the plane, notify the captain and at least one flight attendant that your pet is traveling in the cargo hold. If the captain knows that pets are on board, he or she may take special precautions.
Find out what additional cost is involved.
Inquire if you must fax your vet records beforehand (always keep a copy with you).
Ask what specific maximum carrier measurements are allowed. Your pet should be able to turn around freely and not be cramped. Food and water should be available for cargo transported animals. You may be able to buy a cheaper carrier online so shop around if you have time.

Section 2 Local Moves with a Pet

Schedule your dogs to be groomed the week you leave. They will smell clean, their nails will be trimmed so not to ruin your car’s interior and you won’t be taking a dirty dog into a new home. Consider having long hair dogs shaved or heavily trimmed. You may also want to give your cats a good brushing, since they might shed more when they’re stressed.
If you are sensitive to scents, make sure you agree on the fragrances/cologne spray used. Some shampoos also help with shedding and itching. Ask your groomer. You don’t want your dog itching for the entire trip. Not only is it noisy but it is also hard on the pet since the dog may not have enough room to scratch.
Make your grooming appointment early and don’t wait until the last week. You’re making special requests and you should give them plenty of notice about what you want done so they can schedule the appropriate amount of time and personnel needed Make your reservations early to make sure you can bring your pet and get one of those rooms. The most important thing is to speak with someone directly at the hotel. Make a note of their name and department. Get a direct phone number if you can. Do not make assumptions based on what you read online!.  Make sure to plan ahead and book pet friendly hotels!

Make a list of things you will need for the road and make sure they aren’t packed to go on the moving truck. Always bring a plastic bin with your pets things with you while you are in the process of moving.  Give your pet  plenty of love during th e move.Let them sleep in the bed, take them for walks, take time out to play and feed them their favorite food or treats. It will improve their spirits for the actual move day. Pets are often the last thing on people’s minds during a stressful move. The pets begin to feel unloved and neglected which can bring about more stress and bad behaviors.It is not uncommon for pets to refuse food and water while away from home or in a stressful situation. Keep a close eye on their intake. Try to take time every few hours during moving and travel to walk your pet, set out food and water and try to get them to drink. If their appetite doesn’t improve, you should contact a vet. Some sedatives can cause your pets to become thirsty and if not addressed they become dehydrated. Make sure they have access to plenty of water.Keep a log of when and how much sedative you give. It will prevent you from double dosing should you forget in all the chaos of moving.

Here is a moving checklist to help you decide what to do when with your pet.

 

Moving With Kids

MOVING WITH KIDS -A MOM’S GUIDE TO MOVING

As if moving itself weren’t an feat in itself, adding children to the task can make it seem impossible.  Let me be frank, I have six children, I have moved 8 times in the past 12 years encompassing the East Coast (as well as a 3 year move to Hawaii)  of the United States.  I guess, I could be an expert at moving with munchkins.  I have moved with infants, toddlers, as well as tweens and teens.  I will outline a few things below but none nearly as important as the one major piece of advice I can give:

Keep Them Involved!  If you can , take them house hunting, or have them “find houses” on real estate sites.  Let them feel like they are a major part of the move.

For the  Littles – I always read the many varieties of ” We are Moving” books available as well as coloring pages here’s a printable moving coloring page:

Slide1

Other ways to keep them involved:

A.  When you find the house you are going to buy – ask your real estate agent for the floor plan – have the kids arrange their room – where will the bed go? the dresser? rug?  This is actually really fun.  You can incorporate a measuring activity into it as well – will certain furniture fit, etc.

B.  Have them plan a going away party – It will have them looking forward to something other than the actual feeling of moving

C. Create a scrapbook – take a picture of all the old rooms and write down your best memory that took place in each one.

D.  Give them a really special box to pack – just for their most important items

 

Other Advice which is not nearly as important:

1.  Pack a see-through bin for the first night at your new house that contains anything you may need for that first day at the new house.  It’s kind of like a camping bag – it will contain TP, towel, toothbrush, snacks, sheets/cover, a few dishes/cups, money, iPad…

2.  Your kids may be overwhelmed, it’s natural.  And you probably will be too.  If you can get someone to watch them during the actual move this may be a good idea.  Older kids can help unpack boxes – just make sure you label what boxes they should be opening beforehand.  One time my children started opening my boxes and they opened one that had their teeth from the “tooth fairy.”  Imagine the surprise of my 8 year old who found a box of teeth – that needed lots of explaining!!

3.  Whenever we moved somewhere we always got a large map of the area and put places that were close-by on it.  For example when we moved to Orlando – we put Disney World, Sea World, Busch Gardens but also other places like “school.” “bank,” Whole Foods, etc.

4. Hire a great mover.  Getting a good mover that comes on time and is organized with a professional crew is key.  You don’t want to be stressed out at this time!

Your Friend,

Marie – Interstate Moving Coordinator Monster Movers ®

www.monstermovers.com

 

Mover Help

What is mover help really?  Mover Help is a blog to help the average consumer learn all about preparing, planning and performing a move.  The first helpful moving tips are usually the first thing people look up – the good ole’ moving checklist.  This is really the only moving checklist you will need.  It will prepare you for from up to 6 weeks before your move.  I suggest clicking the checklist link for a comprehensive list or here is a quick download  of a shortened version:

 

moving checklist
Printable Moving Checklist PDF

 

Another useful tool that I have found when you are planning a move is a moving company comparison form.  Of course, first you have to decide if you are going to move yourself or not – but that’s another post.  Frankly, unless you are just starting out and don’t have “real furniture” I always recommend hiring a mover.  Why? To ensure the furniture you just purchased arrives at your new home unscathed.  If you choose a good mover – one with full time labor, licensed and insured, etc.  they should come with shrink wrap to wrap all upholstered items as well as thick moving blankets to protect wooden and metal items.  When comparing movers, I suggest using the printable compare movers form from Monster Movers.  It gives a run down of pertinent questions to ask any movers that you may be considering.